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 Home    Project Nightingale – Shaking up the traditional WA Real Estate Model

Project Nightingale – Sustainable housing coming to Fremantle

 

Nightingale housing is an alternative development model which advocates for the “delivery of designer led multi-residential housing which considers: social health, economic resilience and environmental sustainability”. Put differently, profit is not the prime driving force behind Nightingale multi-residential developments.

One of the catalysts behind the project is Australia’s forecast population growth from 22 – 36 million by 2050. Which means 6.5 million new housing units will be required over the next 35 years. The project directors believe Australia needs more community focused, sustainable development.

There are 18 nightingale projects being developed around Australia and the port city of Fremantle is getting Perth’s first taste. The project will feature 12 apartments and be a venture between long term Western Australian builder Don Fini, land owner Dimitri Kapetas and Dave Delahunty of EDHO architects.

With all Nightingale the project’s investor returns are capped and apartments are delivered at below average prices. Owners in the complex are only able to resell for what they paid plus the average increase in the local vicinity.

More info can be found here: nightingalehousing.org/

nightingalehousing.org/model/

All nightingale housing projects look to achieve:

  1. Affordability – Capped project profits, Designed to reduce operating and maintenance costs.
  2. Transparency – Transparent project costs to investors and purchasers.
  3. Sustainability – Minimum 7.5 star NatHERS thermal rating, Water harvesting and productive gardens.
  4. Deliberative Design – Purchasers given real cost information during the design process to support informed decisions
  5. Community contribution – Contribution back to the local urban community through the creation of connected communities, active street frontages, fine-grain and tactile pedestrian experience for passers-by, and engagement with tenants who can provide ‘third spaces’.